Its 2017: what case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money. And now the new Trudeau Government has promised at least an additional $150 million dollars a year to this biased, wasteful government broadcaster. As is, Taxpayers continue to be hosed to the tune of about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC about the "scandal du jour" and we will continue to expose their reports of waste, abuse and bias while we protect our sources. We take joy in knowing CBC-HQ visits us daily to research our stories such as the CBC Sunshine List, ongoing scandals including the epic Dr. Leenen case against The Fifth Estate (the largest libel case ever awarded against the media in Canadian history) where no one at CBC was fired and taxpayers paid the award and legal costs for this CBC Libel action. Writers and filmmakers take note-this is a Perfect story for a Documentary!

cbcExposed continues to enjoy substantial visitors coming from Universities and Colleges across Canada who use us for research in debates, exams, etc. We ask students to please join us in this mission; you have the power to make a difference! And so can private broadcasters who we know are hurting from the dwindling Advertising revenue pool and the CBC taking money from that pool while also unfairly getting Tax subsidies money. It's time to stop being silent and start speaking up.

Our cbcExposed Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed continue to motivate us to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as exposing their ongoing left wing bully-like news bias. Polls meanwhile show that Canadians favour selling the wasteful government owned media giant and to put our tax money to better use for all Canadians. The Liberals privatized Petro Canada and Air Canada; it’s time for the Trudeau Liberals to privatize the CBC, not give them more tax money.

What does it take for real change at the CBC? You! Our blog now contains a link to the Politicians contact info for you to make your voice heard. Act now and contact your MP, the Cabinet and Prime Minister ... tell them to stop wasting your money, and ... sell the CBC.

Friday, August 18, 2017

Everyone hates the CBC’s new strategic plan

Three ways to complain:

1. “It’s bad for newspapers.”

This is a counterintuitive one, but bear with us. In an editorial for Newspapers Canada, Canadian Newspaper Association chair Bob Cox argues that it’s pointless—and maybe even a little corrupt—for the CBC to be reorienting itself toward online services, precisely because doing so is a business-savvy move—so business-savvy, in fact, that privately owned newspapers are already doing it of their own accord. “There’s no need to pour tax dollars into something the the private sector is already doing without a subsidy, unless the goal is propaganda,” he writes. There’s a certain logic to this. Much of what the government does is aimed at serving the public good in ways private enterprise can’t. Why should the CBC be any different?

2. “It’s bad for employees.”

3. “It’s bad for Canada.”

Read the full story here.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

CBC described as disruptor of media landscape

Private media companies are decrying the CBC’s growing presence on the Internet and in the digital advertising market, calling on Ottawa to rein in the Crown corporation in order to salvage the production of local news and investigative journalism across the country.

At hearings of the Canadian Heritage committee of the House of Commons, the CBC is increasingly described as a great disruptor of the media landscape, with its recent budget increase of $675-million over five years coming as losses are growing and newsrooms are closing in the private sector.

The attacks place the public broadcaster in the same category as foreign Internet giants such as Google and Facebook, which many say are eating into advertising budgets of publishers and broadcasters in Canada while contributing little to the creation of Canadian content.

The CBC is specifically facing criticism over the expansion of its presence on the Internet, including the recent creation of an opinion section on its website with columns and op-eds that are in direct competition with several newspapers.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

CBC Reporter Draws Moral Equivalence Between Palestinian Terror Camps and Israeli Self Defence Camps

CBC Reporter Draws Moral Equivalence Between Palestinian Terror Camps and Israeli Self Defence Camps.

In an “analysis” report published on the CBC’s website today, Mideast correspondent Derek Stoffel implicitly drew a moral equivalence between Palestinian terror training camps that indoctrinate children to hate and murder Israelis, and Israeli boot camps which teach tourists and Israeli security guards how to defend themselves against terror attacks.

Stoffel visited a counterterrorism boot camp in Gush Etzion operated by an Israeli security company called Caliber 3, which teaches 22,000 individuals annually how to defend themselves from a terror attack.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

CBC's answer to its privileged status

Here’s how thinking works in the upper echelons of the CBC.

Canada’s public broadcasting network has been under fire for months over its efforts to build a digital presence in direct competition with private newspapers and other media, which are struggling to survive in the face of remorseless technological change. The private operators maintain it’s unfair that the CBC gets generous subsidies to steal business from them. In a world of shifting readership habits and murderous competition, every penny of revenue is vital. The CBC, they note, already enjoys a federal subsidy of more than $1 billion a year, including a $150 million annual boost introduced by the Trudeau Liberals. Private operators, meanwhile, are hemorrhaging money as the strive to keep the wolf from the door.

The CBC’s response: Ask for even more money from the public purse.

Read the full story here.

Monday, August 14, 2017

CBC’s The National needed a shakeup — but ...

CBC anchor Peter Mansbridge, with his preternaturally calm voice, was the epitome of the omniscient presenter when he stepped down July 1 from the Canadian public broadcaster after three decades.

So it wasn’t a surprise that, in its highly anticipated announcement of a reboot, the CBC decided to cover their bets with more than one anchor for their flagship show The National. But four?

Whether this will be groundbreaking broadcasting or a hot mess will be seen in early November when the new format launches. So far it seems like a logistical nightmare.

Read the full story here.

Friday, August 11, 2017

CBC editors agreed that it was “inappropriate” ...

Honest Reporting Canada - SUCCESS! CBC Retracts Claim that Mahmoud Abbas is a “Staunch Opponent of Violence”.

As we noted in our recent critical analysis of Canadian media coverage of the tensions and terror attacks on the Temple Mount, on July 22, CBCNews.ca had featured Associated Press coverage claiming that Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas is “… a staunch opponent of violence…”

In making this statement, both AP and CBC News inserted their personal opinions into their coverage as this claim is subjective in nature and was not in attribution.

HonestReporting Canada brought these concerns to the attention of CBC editors who agreed that it was “inappropriate” to describe Abbas as a “staunch opponent of violence”. CBC editors retracted this claim and removed it from their news article.

While we appreciate that CBC removed this reference from their news article and that a clarification was issued, regrettably, the CBC did not acknowledge in writing that the language that was removed (not amended) from this article, was their previously describing Abbas as a “staunch opponent of violence”.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

One anchor to replace CBC’s Mansbridge is enough

Letter to the editor:

Re: Preparing for life after Mansbridge, Aug. 8

I don’t like the idea of four rotating anchors for CBC’s The National news broadcast. Ian Hanomansing is the logical replacement for longstanding host Peter Mansbridge. Adrienne Arsenault ought to continue focusing on her excellent international field work. Rosemary Barton should stick to her expertise, Canadian federal issues and politics. As for Andrew Chang, he was doing fine heading Vancouver’s newsroom. I’m afraid this new format will just further reduce the quality and depth of news reporting in Canada.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, August 09, 2017

Why does the CBC compete with newspapers?

Would Netflix want to get into the newspaper business? I doubt it. Then, why is CBC so keen on competing with the print media with its online offerings? Is it breaking the law in doing so?

CBC claimed in its strategy that advertisers are migrating from TV to digital, i.e., Internet services, and declared that is where the (advertising) revenue is. Except the CBC analysis did not reveal that TV as a whole is still ranked number one in revenues. And CBC did not reveal that it is newspapers, not TV, that have truly lost ground to the Internet, the same newspapers CBC wants to compete with.

The reason cbc.ca gets any audience is that CBC viewers and listeners are invited hundreds of times daily to go to CBC’s website; it is a promotional tool that newspapers would die for.

But it is unclear whether the Broadcasting Act permits CBC to operate such unlicensed services and whether CBC should use taxpayers’ money to compete with newspapers.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, August 08, 2017

CBC has operated on a bloated budget ...

CBC president Hubert Lacroix hit the nail on the head, though his eyes were probably tightly closed at the time: Public broadcasters, he said in a 2015 presentation, “risk being boiled to death.”

Correct. For their greed, mismanagement, badly outdated mandate, second-rate products and terminal arrogance.

Sadly, it didn’t take Hubert long to get back into whine mode. Speaking at an international public broadcaster’s convention in Munich, Lacroix belly-ached that budget cuts could threaten the continued existence of outfits like the CBC.

For most of its life, the CBC has operated on a bloated budget, hovering just under or just over, a billion-dollar yearly grant from Canadian taxpayers. Now Lacroix is whining for $400 million more if the CBC is not allowed to sell ads.

For starters, Lacroix should check out the BBC. The British public broadcaster doesn’t subject its home-grown viewers to advertisements or sponsorships.

Lacroix should also have a chat with Paula Kerger, CEO of PBS south of the border. Real public broadcasters don’t sell ads, Hubert. They sell subscriptions and fundraise. That way they don’t put other, unsubsidized media platforms at a huge disadvantage. That way they don’t skew the market. That way they don’t kill competition.

Read the full story here.

Friday, August 04, 2017

Solution for CBC TV is to get cheap and cool

After the numbers are crunched, the layoffs decided and the cuts are cinched, it’s CBC’s main network English TV channel that is in the most need of reimagining.

The situation is dire. CBC TV is at a critical juncture, post-hockey and post-cuts.

In this new reality the perception is that there is no substitute for the high of huge ratings that live sports deliver.

And what CBC TV needs most of all, and soon, is a dose of the cool factor. And it doesn’t necessarily cost a ton of money to become cool.

Hard to imagine now, but it isn’t so long since some of CBC TV’s content seemed different, dashing and chic.

In its new and reduced circumstances, CBC TV has to do more with less. And while it sometimes seems that the best of TV is enormously expensive to develop and produce, that isn’t necessarily the case.

A single chic, must-see show can change everything for a TV channel. And in the new TV landscape, CBC’s main network must, increasingly, be perceived as a quasi-specialty channel.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, August 03, 2017

Will CBC President Hubert Lacroix Get Third term?

Long-time television news broadcaster Tom Clark will head the advisory committee that’s designed to fulfil a Liberal campaign promise to overhaul the process for appointing board members at CBC/Radio-Canada.

The panel will provide Heritage Minister Melanie Joly with a list of qualified candidates for each vacant position, as well as the names of supplementary qualified candidates the government can consider to fill posts in the future.

Critics have for years complained that the process for choosing board members at the CBC left the public broadcaster open to political interference.

Under the Broadcasting Act, CBC/Radio-Canada must have 12 directors on its board, including a chair and a president. Each is expected to serve a five-year term.

Hubert Lacroix’s term as president is set to expire in October.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, August 02, 2017

CBC pulls advertising due to competition

The Canadian Broadcasting Corp. has pulled an advertising campaign that promoted Postmedia Network Canada Corp.’s rollout of a paid content model for its newspaper websites on the basis that it competes with the national broadcaster’s own digital news site.

Postmedia — which owns Canada’s largest chain of English-language daily newspapers including the National Post — said it planned to spend about $15,000 advertising with CBC television stations in Windsor, Regina and Edmonton.

In an email exchange with Postmedia on Monday, CBC’s media sales team said the ads ran for a period of time before an employee from the digital department at one of the stations complained that they seemed to be advertising a product that competes with CBC’s own digital news site, CBC.ca.

CBC accepts advertising for newspaper and magazine ads because it does not operate those types of media, it said and it informed Postmedia the campaign could continue if the ads were changed to focus on the chain’s print newspaper products rather than its digital products.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, August 01, 2017

Another concern with CBC reporting

The complainant, Luanne Roth, had concerns about a bar graph in an article explaining how to follow election results on the CBC news site on B.C. election day. It showed the Green Party ahead of the NDP. Her concern was this graph, pictured on a cellphone, would unduly influence strategic voters who would think the Greens were stronger than the polls indicated. There is no mention of party standing anywhere in this piece, and the context is quite clear. It’s a reminder that copy editing covers pictures too. 

Wayne Williams, the News Director in British Columbia, responded to your complaint.

Mr. Williams acknowledged they should have caught the misrepresentation of the Green support. Dedication to accuracy is a core CBC value. He told me he has discussed this with the team involved, and the fact that you drew this to their attention will make them more vigilant going forward. This was a copy editing error and a reminder that images, as well as text, need close attention.

Read the full report here.

Monday, July 31, 2017

CBC Caves to Pressure

According to a review published on July 26 by CBC Ombudsman Esther Enkin, CBC News has acknowledged that it deleted mentioning in a headline of a March 8 article that a Palestinian terrorist killed by Israeli forces in an arrest raid shootout was a “gunman”.

CBC admits that its editors removed the word “gunman” from their headline after receiving a complaint on the basis that the terrorist’s family had cast doubt that he was an attacker and that the claim was not in attribution.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 28, 2017

Does CBC Ad Violate Human Rights, Labour Laws?

Wanted: Male, 23-35, Any race except Caucasion, Non-union. Send photo and audition tape to the CBC.

So, employment law students, how many violations of the law do you see in that ad?

We are dealing with a job advertisement, so the first place to look is Section 23(1) of the Human Rights Code. That section regulates the content of job ads, and it says this:
The right under section 5 to equal treatment with respect to employment is infringed where an invitation to apply for employment or an advertisement in connection with employment is published or displayed that directly or indirectly classifies or indicates qualifications by a prohibited ground of discrimination
Section 5 says that it’s unlawful to discriminate in employment on the basis of, among other grounds: age, sex, race, ethnicity, and colour. So Section 23(1) prohibits employers from advertising positions that “directly or indirectly” indicate qualifications by age, race, ethnicity, and colour.

Can an Employer require Applicants to be Nonunion?

Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 27, 2017

CBC misjudged demand

CBC/Radio-Canada’s poor numbers from its experiment with paid commercials on Radio 2 and Espace Musique show that the public broadcaster “clearly” misjudged the market for national advertising on its music-focused radio channels, one industry watcher says.

The CBC raised $1.1 million in revenue from ad sales on the two music-focused networks in the 2014 broadcast year, according to the CRTC’s annual report on the financial results of Canadian commercial radio stations.

That’s well below the $10 million the CBC hoped for when the CRTC approved its plan to air ads on the two channels.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Is CBC News Biased?

Is CBC News Biased? Should Canadian Taxpayers Fund the CBC with $1 Billion Every Year?
 
The CBC should be accountable directly to all Canadians. But it is not. Instead, it is accountable to the Prime Minister. He controls CBC funding, and appoints the Board of Directors and President (through the Governor General). Also troubling is that every English-language CBC ombudsman to date has been a former CBC employee -- and therefore potentially biased in favor of the CBC. Given that this unconscionable risk of bias has been allowed, how much confidence can we have in the integrity of CBC management? Has the CBC ever voluntarily admitted to a scandal before being caught?

Read more here.

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Another CBC On Air Correction

Following HRC’s intervention, several times today, CBC News TV and Radio aired on-air corrections to remedy its wrongly reporting on July 14 that Israeli forces killed three Arab terrorists inside the Al Aqsa Mosque.

As we noted in our recent analysis of Canadian media coverage of the terror attack, two Druze Israeli officers were murdered by Arab-Israeli terrorists on the Temple Mount. CBC freelancer Irris Makler had erroneously claimed that Israeli forces killed the three terrorists inside the mosque, which is a very sensitive and revered Muslim holy site, and not outside in the Temple Mount compound.

Read the full story here.

Monday, July 24, 2017

MP files complaint with CBC

An MP has lodged a formal complaint against the CBC for what he considers “shockingly offensive remarks” made in an opinion article featured on their website.

Garnett Genuis, the Conservative MP for Sherwood Park – Fort Saskatchewan, submitted a letter to CBC ombudsman Esther Enkin to raise concerns about an opinion piece by journalist Neil Macdonald headlined “Simple truth is Canada’s mass shooters are usually white and Canadian-born.”

Genuis takes issue with several of the assertions in Macdonald’s column, including a line that the alleged shooter in the Quebec City mosque attack was “Probably a Christian, judging from his name.”

“This is an entirely false and deeply offensive statement that, were it to mention any other religious community, would be recognized immediately as plain bigotry,” the complaint reads in reference to a tweet by CBC’s The National regarding the column.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Politics at the CBC

You think the politicking is tough at Ottawa City Hall. Ha. You ain’t seen nothing yet.

Politics is played at the highest level in the nosebleed executive ranks and in top journo echelons of the CBC.

And what’s at stake in those murky areas? Only the most prestigious spot in journalism.

Replacing the inimitable Peter Mansbridge on The National.

The spot on The National is mostly bingo-calling rather than real journalism. The poor grunts in print, the few who are left, are the real journalists. They write their stories on the ground, file them to the mother ship and Canadian Press sends them to other broadcast and print outlets. Then the great seer of The National deems which ones he will read to a waiting nation while the CBC’s reporters put film around the poor grunt’s story.

So no doubt the knives are out and the makeup is flying to be the most famous person in Canada. And all that reading gets you an Order of Canada and recognition in airports. Makes journalism look pretty petty doesn’t it.

Guess what? Sometimes it really is. But then that’s what happens when one lives in a newsroom where people are trained to listen to gossip. There’s lots of gossip and back-stabbing and jealousy. Often it’s not very nice.

Nowhere is it played at a higher level than at the CBC.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

CBC strategies remain stuck in the twentieth century

Change doesn’t seem to come naturally to the cbc, whose strategies remain stuck in the twentieth century. For more than a decade, The National’s ratings have been stagnant, while Canadians’ trust in media has steadily declined. The ‘90s saw an attempt at restructuring the program: the format at the time was a twenty-two-minute-long news segment at the top of the hour and a current affairs program, The Journal, at the bottom. They combined it into an hour-long news and current affairs show, Primetime News. It was a complete failure. Mark Bulgutch, a former line-up editor for The National who was working on the program at the time, says he knew that the merger wasn’t going to work. “The cbc continues to try to find the right format; to find better formats; to find smarter formats,” Bulgutch says. “It turns its back on the audience at its own peril—when looking for new audiences you’ve got to be careful that you don’t turn off the one that you already have.” The National returned to its pre-merger version a year later, and has remained more or less the same ever since.

For better or worse, and according to the cbc’s 2017-2018 programming slate, a new version of The National will return this fall. The time has come for the public broadcaster to make the fundamental changes necessary to regain its viewers’ trust and to prove its worth—before its audience signs off for good.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Cutbacks at CBC Make Room For Digital Growth

For many Canadians, the CBC is more totem than mere media organization.

Decimated by repeated cuts to its government appropriation, the organization has shed a quarter of its workforce — 3,600 jobs — since 2008. Its core TV audience is also aging out, skewing mostly 55-plus. Possibly worst of all, in 2014 it lost the broadcast streaming rights to NHL games, and its 62-year-old institution, Hockey Night in Canada, was bereft of any actual hockey.

So in 2014, Hubert T. Lacroix, its president and CEO, announced the 2020 Initiative (“A Space For Us All”), a pledge to retool the institution by doubling its digital reach, ensuring its sustainability and personalizing its content for an audience whose media habits had markedly changed.

Lacroix’s vision was very top line — a shrinking of infrastructure, a shift away from a producer’s role to that of a multi-platform broadcaster, a mobile-first approach to news. For some critics, it seemed more a way of putting lipstick on an austerity pig than a bona fide strategic shift.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

CBC TV bets on arts and culture

Just as the private Canadian networks launch schedules full of Muppets, superheroes and other new American series, CBC is wading in with arts and culture. Have they painted themselves into a corner?

Making a serious scheduling commitment to arts programming in prime-time in 2015, however, simply would not happen at a rival broadcaster — which is why Heather Conway is doing it.

Conway, CBC’s executive vice-president of English services, is in the second year of a five-year plan to steer the public broadcaster towards a digital future, and one that is — as she emphasized last May at the CBC season launch —”identifiably Canadian.”

Conway was the chief business officer at the Art Gallery of Ontario prior to joining CBC in 2013. She sees the arts strategy as one that will “make sure we have a distinctive voice, an offering that doesn’t look or feel like anything else on the dial.”

Selling art-related programming on TV has risks, agrees Conway.

Read the full story here.

PS - my question ... will this strategy resonate with average Canadians who are footing the Billion dollar tax bill to support the CBC?

Monday, July 17, 2017

The CBC wants its critics to go away

Canada’s state broadcaster has published an op-ed, not signed by anyone in particular, going after those that disagree with their latest move to expand their mandate well beyond anything contemplated in the Broadcasting Act.

Whether it’s an opinion pages section on their website, on-line music streaming services, producing web-only comedies and dramas or offering a Netflix-style service in Quebec, even mainstream media progressives are beginning to speak up.

 The CBC wants its critics to go away and never speak ill of them again.

Unfortunately, Trudeau’s Liberals are big CBC backers and it’s very unlikely they’ll turn around now and clip their wings after giving them even more taxpayer money.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 14, 2017

CBC to pull away from television and radio

For the second time since the election of Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government last fall, you could hear all employees at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) breathing a big sigh of relief.

The struggling public broadcaster received a reprieve from the new federal government after plans were announced today to provide the network with a $675-million investment over five years. CBC will receive a $75 million boost this year, followed by a $150 million annual increase until 2021.

More than 2,800 positions have been eliminated at the CBC since 2008 due to the Conservative government and changes in the media landscape. The network has lost its once-proud sports department, which is no longer capable of broadcasting professional sports.

The latest plan indicated the CBC would pull away from television and radio and focus more of its resources on digital and mobile platforms.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 13, 2017

The CBC is making all the right noises

Although they are talking of establishing a new five-year “accountability plan” for the CBC, the Liberals seem to think the logic of giving the broadcaster more money is self-evident. Because it’s the CBC, you can imagine them saying.

But given the revolutionary changes to the media landscape, wouldn’t this be a good time to revisit what we want from public broadcasting, and how best to achieve it, before simply writing a giant cheque?

The CBC is making all the right noises about investing much of the new cash in a digital strategy of some kind. That sounds necessarily futuristic and sensitive to the disruptive nature of today’s communications technology.

But as someone who works in privately owned media, as a writer, broadcaster and business owner, I find it hard to understand why the CBC uses taxpayers’ money to operate websites that compete directly with every newspaper, magazine and broadcaster in the country. Is the Internet so short on sources of information that we need another one, subsidized by the government?

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, July 12, 2017

CBC special status shields it from market turbulences.

In November, CBC proposed to withdraw from advertising in exchange for increased government funding. This is a significant move for the corporation because the broadcast-television advertising market, once lucrative, is fragmenting as advertisers shift to digital platforms on televisions, computers and smartphones. Both private broadcasters and the CBC are facing a huge challenge, but CBC’s special status as a taxpayer-subsidized Crown corporation substantially shields it from market turbulences. Private broadcasters don’t have the luxury of public funds to replace declining revenue. 

Both the CBC and private broadcasters are responding to this challenge by expanding their current affairs presence on new digital platforms, which adds to the competitive pressure on the financially hard-pressed newspapers, now investing heavily in digital editions and new business models in a frantic struggle to reverse advertising declines.

The traditional argument for taxpayers subsidizing public broadcasters is the challenge of creating television content in a relatively small Canadian market. But an important question remains: is the digital market where we fund public broadcasters? Do we want CBC competing for digital advertising dollars with the Winnipeg Free Press and other papers across the country? Is the CBC’s expansion into this sector a threat to Canadian newspapers adapting and surviving in the digital era?

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, July 11, 2017

CBC Internal Memo Short on Promises

Yesterday’s federal budget included investing $675 million over five years into the CBC. The broadcaster will receive the first, $75-million round of funding this year and $150 million every year following.

An internal memo obtained by CANADALAND sheds some light on how the CBC plans to spend the new dollars. Notable journalistic commitments are investing into digital bureous across the country and bettering international coverage with “pocket bureaus.”

Read the full memo here.

Monday, July 10, 2017

CBC seen as digital uber predator

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has a looming public-relations problem.

That's because in the eyes of other media, the public broadcaster is seen as an uber predator in an age of diminishing ad revenues.

In fact, iPolitics publisher James Baxter even used this term, "uber predator", in a recent presentation to the Commons Heritage committee.

The controversy has arisen over CBC's insistence on competing with other media companies for digital advertising. And it comes after the Trudeau government announced $675 million in new funding for CBC over the next five years.

Read the full story here.

Friday, July 07, 2017

CBC president Hubert Lacroix Embarrassed ...

From his 2008 appointment until he became the focus of an internal audit, CBC president Hubert Lacroix claimed nearly $30,000 in improper expenses ...
“We’ve been reporting a lot on ineligible expense claims by public officials, now we have a story in our own backyard,” CBC reporter Rosemary Barton announced ...
The CBC does not release the salaries of its top executives, but Mr. Lacroix is paid between $358,400 and $421,600 per year.
Read the full story here.

Thursday, July 06, 2017

Is the CBC is a biased broadcasting institution?

This question was asked at this website (quora.com) and here is just one response ...

CBC has a reputation in Canada as being very progressive/left wing. Supporting left wing political parties may actually be self-serving for the public broadcaster. Liberal governments have consistently offered support for CBC, while Conservative governments have generally cut their budget. Supporting the CBC was in fact one of Justin Trudeau's campaign promises when he came to power with the Liberals during the last election.

For their part though, CBC has, like any good journalistic establishment should, done its best to remain unbiased, but they definitely have a reputation in Canada for being friendly with Liberals and harsh with Conservatives.

See many more responses here.

PS - what do YOU think?

Wednesday, July 05, 2017

CBC apologists scramble ...

CBC apologists scramble to fix Trudeau’s Freudian slip.

Canada’s Prime Minister rattled off all of the provinces and territories in his speech over the weekend, except Alberta.

He then awkwardly got back up on stage and offered a half apology, but was it really a mistake and are Albertans overreacting?

But over at the CBC, they seem to think it was just honest human error.

Let’s face it, the CBC just wishes this was a “mistake, but it took a Canadian-born celebrity living in Los Angeles, Sandra Oh, to first call Trudeau out for forgetting about Alberta.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, July 04, 2017

Does Public Broadcasting have a future?

In an increasingly fractured, crowded and competitive media environment, what is the role of the public broadcaster when it comes to news? How to attract a new generation of audiences and retain existing ones? What innovations bode well for the future of news?

It seems the idea of public service journalism is under fire everywhere. So three major public broadcasters came together to talk about their collective future at a forum held in Toronto by the Canadian Journalism Foundation: Jennifer McGuire, General Manager and Editor-in-Chief of CBC News, James Harding, Director of News and Current Affairs of the BBC, and Michael Oreskes, Senior Vice-President of News and Editorial Director of NPR. The discussion was moderated by Simon Houpt of The Globe and Mail.

See more here.

Friday, June 30, 2017

CBC producers affirming their assumed superiority

CBC reporters and producers affirming their assumed superiority by churning out a constant stream of intellectual bigotry.

With the CBC’s TV ratings down 40% to a specialty channel-like 5% share of viewers even before it lost its NHL contract, according to Canadian Media Research, it’s worth asking again what has gone wrong with the Mother Corp and what should be done about it? The answer to the first question is that it no longer represents ordinary Canadians to themselves in a way they like or even recognize. So when its funding comes under scrutiny, it is not surprising that most Canadians collectively yawn while watching any of the myriad other channels available to them on various media platforms.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Peter Mansbridge on CBC retirement

Peter Mansbridge doesn’t want to make a fuss about leaving the anchor’s chair at CBC’s The National.

Nearly a year after telling viewers he planned to retire from the public broadcaster’s flagship program, the 68-year-old newsman who defined an era at CBC News plans to sign-off for the final time with little fanfare.

“Don’t expect much,” he said in a recent interview. “I’ve never wanted it to be about me, this program.”

Mansbridge isn’t leaving news entirely and has already spoken to the CBC about working on a “freelance” basis, although he remains cagey on exactly what that means.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

CBC manager denies being asked to investigate complaints ...

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's director of network talk radio is contradicting comments made by Chris Boyce, head of CBC Radio, saying that she was never asked to investigate complaints about Jian Ghomeshi's behaviour within the Q unit.

In an email to Boyce, Linda Groen said, "I have to set the record straight on one particular point" regarding comments Boyce made on CBC's the fifth estate last Friday.

“At no point did you or any senior manager ever instruct me to conduct such an investigation, formally or otherwise,” Groen wrote. “To the contrary, I was assured and confident that you and HR were handling the matter and asking the appropriate people the necessary questions.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

CBC’s Peter Mansbridge says goodbye to himself

Peter Mansbridge has made tens of millions of dollars from the CBC. (By which I mean, from you, the taxpayer, although we aren’t permitted to know exactly how much.)

His time on the air is now coming mercifully to an end, though we’ll be paying his pension for a while.

So what’s Peter Mansbridge like, in the bias department?

We don’t quite know, because he keeps a lot of secrets. Like his secret trip to Italy to preside over the wedding of Kate Purchase, who is now Justin Trudeau’s communications director.

At the CBC, it’s clearly a corporate decision to be politically biased.

Read the full story here.

Monday, June 26, 2017

CBC took the rare step of apologizing

The CBC attempted to cram 150 years of Canadian history into the 10-hour docu-drama "Canada: The Story of Us." By many accounts, it's not doing so well.

But this isn't the only series that has failed to capture our rich and varied past, celebrated historian Christopher Moore said Wednesday, lamenting a general "fear of historians" that has marked "almost every film project and television project" he's been involved with.

Moore, who was not a part of the CBC production, blamed the downfall of such shows on "producers and directors who essentially are determined to become instant experts."

The Toronto-based writer added his voice to a chorus of complaints plaguing "Canada: The Story of Us," which premiered March 26.

The CBC took the rare step of apologizing Tuesday, noting "we fully recognize that not everyone will agree with every perspective presented."

Read the full story here.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Canadians have no idea of CBC cost

The day Lisa LaFlamme debuted as Lloyd Robertson's successor anchoring the CTV National News, CBC bought full-page newspaper advertisements promoting its flagship newscast and anchor Peter Mansbridge.

Judging from a new poll, the public broadcaster might better have used the ad space to show Canadians how its money was being spent.

The Abacus Data poll commissioned by QMI Agency and published in the Toronto Sun, suggests taxpayers underestimate how much the CBC gets from the federal government while at the same time most think it's getting too much.

According to the poll, more than 80 per cent of the 1,003 people sampled in the online poll conducted in English Aug. 12-15 did not know the CBC will get $1.1 billion from Ottawa this year. About 25 per cent believe it gets only one-tenth of its actual grant and 21 per cent thought it was only $10 million.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

CBC employees overpaid

News media is undergoing a rapid and beautiful process of creative destruction: digitalization means vastly lower costs, fewer barriers to entry, and a wider variety of competing options for consumers to enjoy. Amid this innovation and weeding out stands the too-big-to-fail albatross, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

The truth is that the CBC has become a gravy train for elites, with the backing of government unions. These elites have managed to persuade people that they are desperate and hard done by, while the average salary at the broadcaster is $100,528 per year. That is well into the top 10 per cent of all Canadian earners and 23 per cent more than the average earnings of a private-sector TV employee, even before the CBC's luxurious benefits.

Not only are CBC employees overpaid, their performance has been questionable. Their advertising revenues have fallen 32 per cent in just the last year, and 12.2 per cent annually for the past five years. Those five years may have been difficult for the industry, but private broadcasters saw annual declines of just 1.7 per cent. On account of CBC's consistent decline, taxpayers provided 68.5 per cent of funding in 2015.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

CBC board has new selection process

The federal Liberals have put together a star-studded cast to help choose new members of the public broadcaster's board of directors.

Long-time television news broadcaster Tom Clark will head the advisory committee that's designed to fulfil a Liberal campaign promise to overhaul the process for appointing board members at CBC/Radio-Canada.

Critics have for years complained that the process for choosing board members at the CBC left the public broadcaster open to political interference.

Under the Broadcasting Act, CBC/Radio-Canada must have 12 directors on its board, including a chair and a president. Each is expected to serve a five-year term.

The term of the current chair, Remi Racine, was to end Tuesday. Hubert Lacroix's term as president is set to expire in October.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Current CBC board boasts little outside broadcast industry experience

The Liberal government is overhauling the process by which members of the board of directors of CBC/Radio-Canada are selected, in hopes of ending decades of allegations of political interference in the public broadcaster’s operations.

The Globe and Mail has learned the Minister of Canadian Heritage, Mélanie Joly, will announce on Tuesday the creation of the Independent Advisory Committee for Appointments to the CBC/Radio-Canada Board of Directors.

It will likely please many who have called for non-partisan appointments to the board, including the Canadian Media Guild, the union that represents most English-language CBC staff.

Critics have noted that the current CBC board boasts little outside broadcast industry experience, and does not reflect Canada’s diversity.

The term of the current CBC chair, Rémi Racine, expires Tuesday; the term of the CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, expires at the end of the year. While each man may reapply for another term, the government source noted that both would need to submit to the same new Advisory Committee process as all other candidates who wish to be considered.

Read the full story here.

Monday, June 19, 2017

CBC is the Globe's largest competitor in the digital ad space

The publisher of the Globe and Mail newspaper, Philip Crawley, told members of Parliament who are examining Canada's beleaguered news industry that the Globe's ownership isn't seeking "handouts or subsidies — but we do like to play on a level playing field."

"It's not level if taxpayer dollars directed to the public broadcaster make the competition for digital ad dollars more difficult. The CBC is the Globe's largest competitor in the digital ad space amongst Canadian-based media."

Read the full story here.

Friday, June 16, 2017

3 Anchors to replace Peter Mansbridge

Three anchors will replace Peter Mansbridge at the new version of CBC's flagship national news program, "The National."

The incoming hosts will also report in the field, said Jennifer McGuire, general manager and editor-in-chief of CBC News. However, the people who will fill the high-profile positions are still being decided.

"As yet, no decisions have been made with respect to who will replace Peter and October 30th is the launch date, "said CBC spokesman Chuck Thompson in an email to HuffPost Canada on Thursday.

The newscast is currently being revamped to better reflect "the continuous digital news environment that we live in," McGuire said in May.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Report calls for CBC to stop selling digital ads

A public-policy group has issued 12 recommendations to revive the Canadian news industry, including cutting off digital revenue to the public broadcaster.

The report by the Public Policy Forum maintains that the decline of traditional media, audience fragmentation, and fake news are undermining faith in Canadian democracy.

"Free cbc.ca of the need to 'attract eyeballs' for digital advertising, which can run contrary to its civic-function mission and draw it into a 'clickbait' mentality," the report states.

As things stand now, the CBC generates about $25 million in annual digital revenue, according to the report.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

CBC handling of complaints

When a formal complaint is made against information published or broadcast by CBC (whether an in-house production or a report or documentary produced by a third party), the executive producer responsible for the content in question undertakes to reply promptly.

If the complainant is not satisfied with the explanations given and applies to the Ombudsman for a review, CBC undertakes to make the Ombudsman’s opinion accessible by, among other means, posting a link on the program web page or on the page giving access to the content in question.

See the full procedure here.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

CBC’s coverage of Six Day War unbalanced and unfair

Amazingly, in the CBC’s reporting on the impact of the Six Day War as we mark its 50th anniversary, nowhere did reports by Mideast correspondent Derek Stoffel mention that the war was waged by pan-Arab armies seeking the destruction of Israel.

Derek Stoffel’s June 5 article on the CBC’s website and his June 6 CBC Radio report on World at Six Stoffel failed to mention the cause of the Six Day War, where Egyptian, Jordanian and Syrian armies tried to annihilate the State of Israel.

To focus only on the aftermath of the Six Day War and to completely ignore what started it, was most unbalanced and unfair.

Read the full story here.

Monday, June 12, 2017

CBC ombudsman slams CBC

The CBC's own watchdog has found reporting on Israel by the state broadcaster did not meet values of accuracy, balance, and impartiality. Eric Duhaime joined Krista Erickson to discuss.

See the video here.

Friday, June 09, 2017

CBC Announces 'The National' Revamp

CBC News has announced a new organizational structure, with a heavy emphasis on digital as well as changes to "The National."

In a memo distributed to staff on Tuesday, editor-in-chief Jennifer McGuire said digital will now be a part of everything CBC News does and "not a stand-alone pillar" of its service.

Journalist Steve Ladurantaye, who was Twitter Canada's head of news and government partnerships before joining the CBC last May, has been appointed the new managing editor of "The National," and tasked with "redefining 'The National' for the next generation."

Read the full story here.

Thursday, June 08, 2017

CBC says statements were "substantially true"

The CBC says it gave Subway plenty of opportunity to refute the findings of an investigation into the sandwich chain's chicken products before airing reports that prompted a defamation lawsuit from the company.

Subway alleges in its lawsuit that the CBC acted "recklessly and maliciously" in airing a report that suggested some chicken products served by the chain could contain only 50 per cent chicken or less. The sandwich chain further alleges the tests "lacked scientific rigour."

The sandwich chain is seeking $210 million in damages, saying its reputation and brand have taken a hit as a result of the CBC reports. It is also seeking recovery of out-of-pocket expenses it says were incurred as part of efforts to mitigate its losses.

The broadcaster says the statements that Subway objects to are "substantially true" and were made "in good faith and without malice on matters of public interest."

The CBC also questions Subway's claim that its revenue and reputation have suffered, and says any damage the chain has experienced is unrelated to the report.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Did CBC Commit An Act Of Hate Speech?

What would happen if the CBC--Canada's public broadcaster, the purported bastion of tolerance--violated Alberta's Human Rights Act ("AHRA")? We may soon find out.

On January 20, 2017, producers for the CBC program Marketplace printed t-shirts containing racist logos and mottos, including "white power" and "white pride world wide [sic]," and hired a middle-aged white man to stand on a Toronto street to peddle the t-shirts and yell racist slogans.

The episode is titled "The Trump Effect" and was broadcast throughout Canada, including Alberta. It remains as a monument to our public broadcaster's colossal ignorance on the CBC YouTube channel.

Shortly after the episode aired, an American journalist inquired in a tweet if this is what passes for journalism in Canada. The tweet piqued my interest, so I tried to watch the show.

I couldn't finish it. It was chockful of frustrating errors, including one near the beginning of the show where onscreen graphics and dialogue equate "intolerant speech" and "hate speech". The Supreme Court of Canada ("SCC") has already ruled that these are not the same thing.

But not only is this episode the epitome of so-called "fake news" -- fabricating a story in order to report it -- it's also deeply ironic. By broadcasting this content in Alberta, the CBC likely violated Alberta's hate speech law.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, June 06, 2017

CBC Bet $80 Million And Lost

CBC TV has struggled ever since it lost NHL hockey to Rogers in 2013. Sports, especially hockey, have always been the CBC's fallback programming strategy and when Rogers swooped in and paid billions for the NHL, the dazed CBC responded like a concussed defenceman. To compensate, CBC acquired the rights to the 2014 Sochi and 2016 Rio Olympics and even before the 2016 games were in the books, the public broadcaster agreed to pay the IOC until 2024.

CBC management said that the Olympics would "break even" or "make a small profit" and that the decision was "fiscally responsible."

Did CBC make a good business decision for taxpayers, its 'shareholders'? Did the games break even or make a profit? CRTC data on CBC ad revenues show that the Olympics had a relatively modest impact on revenues in 2016. CBC English increased revenues by some $45 million in 2016 and the French network had basically no increase. So, overall, in 2016 the Olympics cost the CBC $80 million and generated incremental revenues of only about $45 million, creating a net loss of some $35 million.

Read the full story here.

Monday, June 05, 2017

Does CBC/Radio-Canada need saving?

While some have been sounding the alarm for a while now, there is a perfectly viable way for the CBC to keep on operating even if the money it gets from Ottawa keeps on shrinking: direct funding from viewers, a model that works very well south of the border.

First of all, let's do away with the myth that CBC/Radio-Canada is being starved of funding. Between 2000 and 2014, government funding to the CBC was reduced by 11 per cent in real terms, while total revenues fell by just 2 per cent. Under the current government, the largest cut occurred in 2013 with a 6 per cent reduction. To put that in perspective, the previous government slashed public funding to the broadcaster by 20 per cent in 1996 and by a further 26 per cent in 1997. So current cuts are not as draconian as some would have us believe.

Still, there have been cuts, and these may indeed continue, which is why the CBC should start transitioning toward being partially financed directly by its viewers. In the United States, an average of 30 per cent of the funding for public radio and public television comes from individual subscriptions, with tax-based funding representing only 36 per cent of total revenues.

Quebec's community radios receive only 20 per cent of their revenues through government subsidies and they're able to offer good local and regional coverage.

Read the full story here.

Friday, June 02, 2017

CBC Exposed

What case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money.

And now the new Trudeau Government has promised at least an additional $150 million dollars a year to this biased, wasteful government broadcaster.

As is, Taxpayers continue to be hosed to the tune of about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

Make your voice heard!

Thursday, June 01, 2017

Harassment claims at CBC emerge

Following the April 2015 release of the Rubin Report, which detailed workplace abuse and institutional failures at CBC’s Q, many internal changes are being championed by the public broadcaster. Bullying awareness posters are plastered throughout the halls and every employee must take online training to help prevent bullying and harassment.

In media interviews, CBC executives and spokespeople assure the public that institutional changes are taking place.

But CANADALAND has learned of serious bullying, harassment, and workplace abuse complaints at the CBC, throughout its departments. Through conversations with over a dozen CBC employees, our investigation revealed that CBC Radio One, CBC TV Sports, and CBC human resources have all experienced, or are experiencing, allegations of workplace bullying and abuse.

CBC Radio’s flagship current affairs program As It Happens is known for its aggressive accountability journalism and for asking unflinching questions, sometimes posed to the CBC itself. This past winter, As It Happens producers began approaching the CBC’s union, the Canadian Media Guild, with serious workplace complaints. Soon, CMG Toronto President Naomi Robinson compiled a list of 21 allegations from “about a dozen” current and former As It Happens producers. No official union grievances were filed.

This document, taken from an email sent by Robinson, was provided to CANADALAND by two sources who asked to stay confidential to protect their careers. The CBC denies all of the allegations that follow.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Union calls for CBC president Hubert Lacroix to step down

CBC president and CEO Hubert Lacroix has had a rocky eight years at the helm of Canada’s public broadcaster, and the union that represents most of his employees is now calling for him to step down.

The Canadian Media Guild, which represents the employees of CBC’s English services as well as its French services outside Quebec and New Brunswick, says Lacroix and his board of directors have lost their legitimacy and the confidence of the staff.

While Lacroix has presided over budget cuts, asset sales and falling ratings, his biggest challenges have been ethical and personnel scandals that challenged the CBC’s personality-focused system. Here’s a look back at some of the biggest controversies involving CBC stars since Lacroix — who wasn’t immediately available for comment — took over.

Check them out here.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

CBC violating the Broadcast Act

The publisher of the Globe and Mail newspaper, Phillip Crawley, told members of Parliament who are examining Canada's beleaguered news industry that the Globe's ownership isn't seeking "handouts or subsidies — but we do like to play on a level playing field."

"It's not level if taxpayer dollars directed to the public broadcaster make the competition for digital ad dollars more difficult. The CBC is the Globe's largest competitor in the digital ad space amongst Canadian-based media."

Crawley, one of more than a half dozen witnesses appearing Tuesday, was flanked by an unlikely ally — Brian Lilley of Rebel Media, an online news and right-wing opinion outlet that delights in skewering the dreaded mainstream (or "lamestream") media, of which the Globe might be considered a charter member.

"You can't have a level playing field when the public broadcaster ... has decided that they want to be all things to all people," said Lilley.

"I will tell you emphatically that CBC has been violating the Broadcast Act and their mandate for a long time."

Read the full story here.

Monday, May 29, 2017

Andrew Scheer would axe CBC news

Conservative leadership candidate Andrew Scheer suggested that if he were to become prime minister, he would axe the news division of CBC.

“I think taxpayers are very frustrated by how much the CBC costs,” Scheer said in an interview with Hamilton Community News.

“I don’t know why this government is in the news business in this day and age with so many platforms with so many ways to disseminate information,” he told the paper, adding that, the government has a “glaring” conflict operating the CBC.

Read the full story here.

Friday, May 26, 2017

CBC pension plan is flawed by design

In 2010, CBC employees contributed $26.9 million to their pensions, but $51.2 million was added by taxpayers. While the split is supposed to be 50/50, CBC has chosen to ask taxpayers to fund the deficit without asking employees to contribute more. To properly fund the pension solvency shortfall, the CBC, under normal accounting rules, would be required to fund an extra $160 million each year over the next five years.

The CBC pension is a mature plan: more than 9,066 retirees are receiving money from the plan but only 8,086 employees paying into it. Every employee fired from CBC increases the cash required from taxpayers to prop up a plan that is flawed by design.

Read the full story here.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

CBC History Minefield

History is a minefield. Just ask the CBC, whose Canada 150 series, The Story of Us, has blown up in its face. The outrage is running high. With their blood still boiling after the Andrew Potter-McGill affair, Quebeckers say the French role in nation-building doesn’t get nearly enough play. On top of that, they’re incensed because the French fur traders and explorers are portrayed as scraggly ruffians with bad grooming. Major victim groups such as the Acadians are ignored (at least through the early episodes). The series is an insult to aboriginals, say some. Even the mayor of Annapolis Royal is upset because his town doesn’t get a mention, even though there was a settlement there. To set the record straight, he wants the CBC to do another episode – a prequel – presumably in time for tourist season.

Following the path of least resistance, the CBC’s president has now issued a craven apology to all those who were, are and remain to be offended by any errors of commission, omission, or lack of sufficient air time. Their numbers will no doubt swell beyond counting. The truth is that the poor old CBC was doomed the moment it commissioned the project. History is so contentious these days, and identity groups so aggrieved, that almost everyone was bound to be upset.

In fact, the series is so politically correct that it makes your teeth ache.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

CBC president Hubert Lacroix defends American programming

CBC president Hubert Lacroix has defended the Canadian public broadcaster’s use of American syndicated game shows as lead-ins to its primetime schedule.

Lacroix told webcast for CBC listeners Wednesday that Jeopardy! and Wheel of Fortune, acquired from CBS Paramount International Television, are cheaper to program than homegrown shows, and “raise the awareness of the rest of our programming schedule.”

The CBC topper also rejected criticism that the Canadian public broadcaster is airing primetime fluff to bolster ratings in competition with rivals like CTV and Global Television that air mostly popular U.S. network series in primetime.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Why should the CBC be any different?

In an editorial for Newspapers Canada, Canadian Newspaper Association chair Bob Cox argues that it’s pointless—and maybe even a little corrupt—for the CBC to be reorienting itself toward online services, precisely because doing so is a business-savvy move—so business-savvy, in fact, that privately owned newspapers are already doing it of their own accord.

“There’s no need to pour tax dollars into something the the private sector is already doing without a subsidy, unless the goal is propaganda,” he writes. There’s a certain logic to this. Much of what the government does is aimed at serving the public good in ways private enterprise can’t. Why should the CBC be any different?

Read the full story here.

Friday, May 19, 2017

CBC's The National managing editor removed

CBC has removed the new managing editor of The National, the third media leader in Canada to lose his job or step down over the past week after weighing in on the toxic subject of cultural appropriation. 

Steve Ladurantaye, who had been tapped in March to oversee the reinvention of CBC-TV’s flagship evening newscast, was reassigned Wednesday afternoon, less than one week after joining a number of other Canadian media executives last Thursday in a late-night Twitter conversation in which he issued a tweet that appeared to express support for their idea of a so-called “appropriation prize.”

Read the full story here.

Thursday, May 18, 2017

CBC described as a predator

Canadian journalism is in the midst of industrial and market failure. Print and broadcast journalism are struggling to adapt to both the economic models of the digital economy as well as the media consumption habits of digitally-enabled citizens. Meanwhile, our small size, lack of VC funding, large presence of U.S. digital journalism companies, combined with the rise of Facebook, Google and the pernicious effect of the ad-tech industry has led to a market failure in the funding model for Canadian digital journalism.

As a recent Public Policy Forum report (for which we were research principals) argues, it is time that Canadian media policy adapt to the realities of the digital age. While much of the coverage of the report has focused on the establishment of a Future of Journalism and Democracy Fund, in our minds the most critical recommendation concerns the CBC – namely, that the CBC should begin publishing all civic journalism content under a Creative Commons license.

Rightly or wrongly, many people that we spoke to for this project, in both the traditional and new media, described the CBC as a “predator.” This should concern all proponents of the CBC.

Read the full story here.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

CBC mandate must be revisited

Back in June 2014, when the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation lost the rights for Hockey Night in Canada, Canada’s private news media’s future was set, more or less, to “Screwed.”

The Ceeb was losing its fattest revenue vein and entering survival mode just as news reportage was migrating to smartphones from newspapers, televisions, radios and desktop computers. It was then, as the broadcaster looked to reinvent itself, that all of us should have demanded its mandate be revisited — for every other news organization’s sake.

Two years later, without that re-examination, the CBC’s future is healthy while its competitors in privately owned print news cling to life. The reason: the CBC’s wholesale migration to the mobile web, by way of which our tax dollars are underwriting print news (and now even newspaper-like opinion) for the price — zero — that most Canadians are willing to pay to read such stuff on their iPhones.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Government calls for CBC to be accountable ...

The CBC’s president says the public broadcaster will not use its $675-million windfall from Tuesday’s federal budget to restore what it lost through years of cutbacks, and will instead spend on current priorities such as digital platforms, local news bureaus and original programs.

But the CBC alone may not get to decide all priorities. The government has promised to hammer out a five-year “accountability plan” with the broadcaster.

Read the full story here.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Liberals Say CBC Mandate Would Include Promoting, Distributing Canadian Films

At a debate on the future of the arts industry, Liberal incumbent Stephane Dion said the party would temporarily add promoting and distributing Canadian feature films to the public broadcaster's mandate.

Dion said the CBC's role as a platform for Canadian arts and culture is "paramount," something he said was made clear during recent consultations.

"The role all witnesses at the hearings wanted the CBC to play in the distribution and marketing of Canadian feature films is something we'll put in the mandate of the CBC — not only the amount of money but we'll negotiate a mandate of five years," he said.

Read the full story here.

Friday, May 12, 2017

CBC has trouble understanding today's youth

Like many 70-plus Canadians, the CBC has trouble understanding today's youth. It's being left behind by changing technology and struggling to maintain its lifestyle on a fixed income that's been shrinking for the better part of three decades.

In 2007, a federal government report recommended that the "government of Canada commit to stable, multi-year funding for CBC/Radio-Canada." The Harper Conservatives not only ignored that advice but actually slashed the broadcaster's budget.

While Harper has proven he's no fan of the CBC, to be fair, kicking the corporation in the teeth is a bipartisan tradition that goes back decades to Brian Mulroney, but Jean Chretien did the most damage.

If anything, the fact that parties on both sides of the aisle seem united in their disdain for the CBC proves that the corporation is probably an institution worth saving, says Ian Morrison, spokesperson for the watchdog group Friends of Canadian Broadcasting.

According to Morrison, one of the big problems with the CBC is that its board of directors and president are government-appointed.

"There's a cancer at the top, and that is the political patronage system of its governance," he says. "It does not ensure that the best and the brightest are there."

Current CBC president Hubert Lacroix was a corporate lawyer with little experience in broadcasting or managing a large enterprise before his appointment, notes Morrison.

According to former head of CBC English broadcasting Richard Stursberg, who served under Lacroix for two years before he was sacked in 2010, Lacroix is no exception.

"It's interesting if you look back over all the presidents. I don't think any of them had a media background," says Stursberg. "I don't think most of them had ever run anything bigger than a bath."

Read the full story here.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

CBC listeners were misled

On May 3, HonestReporting Canada filed a complaint with CBC Editor-in-Chief Jennifer McGuire bringing our concerns to the CBC’s attention regarding a biased radio report it aired about the treatment and conditions of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails.
On April 30 at 8:13pm, CBC Radio aired a report by Irris Makler on a hunger strike which has been carried out by hundreds of Palestinian prisoners in Israeli jails, along with other Palestinians elsewhere in solidarity with the prisoners, and British students abroad.
Ms. Makler’s report noted that Israel’s Ofer prison has been a focus of the protests. Makler stated the following: “The hunger strikers are demanding better medical treatment, more family visits, and crucially, an end to Israel’s controversial policy of detention without trial.”
HonestReporting Canada contends that this CBC Radio report was deficient on two grounds:
  1. No context was given to explain that Israel contends that its prison system is in adherence to Israeli law and international standards
  2. CBC listeners were misled into thinking that Israel detains Palestinian “political prisoners,” not individuals incarcerated for terror-related offences
Read the full story here.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

CBC criticized over digital news

The publisher of the Globe and Mail newspaper, Philip Crawley, told members of Parliament who are examining Canada's beleaguered news industry that the Globe's ownership isn't seeking "handouts or subsidies — but we do like to play on a level playing field."

"It's not level if taxpayer dollars directed to the public broadcaster make the competition for digital ad dollars more difficult. The CBC is the Globe's largest competitor in the digital ad space amongst Canadian-based media."

The Commons committee is examining the state of Canada's media industry, with a particular emphasis on how structural changes to the market created by the digital age have undercut local news reporting. It's a global, multi-headed problem.

Through it all, the CBC has been a frequent target of testimony at the hearings, which began last February.

"My colleagues and I in the industry do not support the notion that handing out more money to the CBC helps local or national newspapers," Crawley, who also serves as co-chair of The Canadian Press news agency, said Tuesday.

Read the full story here.

Tuesday, May 09, 2017

CBC challenged on story in Venezuela

This is an opinion piece submitted to us following a story published by the CBC.  They wanted to present a very different side to the story that the CBC put forward.

We welcome stories from our readers when they feel that the CBC has wrongly portrayed events in their opinion and want our readers to make up their minds when all sides of the story are presented.
___________________________

I was shocked when I read the tweet from a Canadian news company, CBC https://twitter.com/CBCNews/status/859241139819483136 blaming the opposition for trying to stage a coup in Venezuela, my country.

Considering, as we all know, the statement from the Canadian Government regarding Venezuela, this article left me a bit perplexed:

http://www.international.gc.ca/oas-oea/2017-04-Resolution_Venezuela.aspx?lang=eng

Venezuela is a rich country, although paradoxically dying of hunger, lack of medicines, and social disregard by the government.

Ever since Hugo Chavez started governing my country, companies were expropiated, private properties taken away from their rightful owners so “the people” could use them. You can turn to the news and check what the situation of those properties, then seized by the government is now: Non-productive and abandoned because “the people” lacked the expertise to take care of anything they were given, and in turn the government could not care less, already having met its goal: it had already sent the message that it cared for the less fortunate in Venezuela, but it was all a façade: it kept making them poorer by the day. All Chavez pretended was to give the idea of taking care of the less fortunate when all he wanted was power and riches.

Where Chavez did well was at making friends: He made sure all his revolutionary neighbors had substantial help from him, giving oil at ridiculous terms, mostly in exchange of loyalty. He used Venezuela as his personal wallet. This fortuneless man ended up amassing one of the biggest fortunes of Latin America. During his time in office, Venezuela started to be known for drug traficking.
When Maduro arrived in power, his only merit was having been appointed by Chavez. It was apparent that this clueless man with no studies had an impossible task to accomplish: inflation ratse were soaring, the militias were everywhere cand ontrolling everything. Day in and day out, much like his predecessor, he claimed that somebody, somewhere was staging a coup d’état against him, he accussed Spain, the USA, Colombia, any country could be guilty, just seach on youtube: “Maduro Acusa”:


I could keep on adding links, maybe one per month ever since he first sat in office, 4 years ago.
As everyone knows, drug trafficking has become a major issue in Venezuela: two nephews of Venezuela’s first lady are awaiting sentence for drug trafficking into the United States. Tareck al Aisami, Vicepresident of Venezuela, is suspected to be a drug lord; he is actually facing many sanctions from USA’s Government. 

Another one of the big names in Venezuela is Diosdado Cabello, he is a military man and a polititian. He was the President of the National Assembly until Dec 2015 there are many reports on him for being a member of the drug cartel “El Cartel de los Soles”


On January 17th 2017, Mr Cabello said that “No more elections will be held, what we will have is even more revolution” 


The government shows pictures of young masked students throwing pebbles at national guards, they must have their face covered or else they go detained just by being in the street. And if they throw pebbles or return the gas bombs they are thrown at is only because they have no means of defending themselves under the constant agression of the government and militia forces.

The government declares my country as a democracy. Yet why are they even holding political prisoners and why do they forbid visits to them from both their families and their legal representatives? There are documents ordering the release of many prisoners and yet they are still incarcerated. There is permission granted to Lilian Tintori to visit opposition leader Leopoldo Lopez and yet she has not been able to see him for the las 32 days.

All Venezuela wants is Humanitarian help: food, medicines, release and political rehabilitation of political prisioners, Peace and Freedom. If violence escalates, we Venezuelans, hold the government responsible.

The government calls it a revolution, talks about war. But we say, war is when both sides are armed.

What I clearly see in Venezuela is GENOCIDE.

* I asked permission to a journalist, Pableysa Ostos, to post a picture taken by her in Puerto Ordaz.



https://twitter.com/PableOstos/status/859811251354046464

Respectfully submitted,

Carmen F.

Monday, May 08, 2017

CBC in midst of identity crisis

People inside will tell you that, from day to day, marching orders change, priorities shift and budgetary restraints are slapped on and off like rusty handcuffs. Outsiders who deal with the broadcaster will tell you that, on any given day, the CBC appears to be quite good at one thing: internal confusion.
This identity crisis is rooted in its very DNA.
The Broadcasting Act, which guides the CBC, was last amended in 1991. This means the CBC mandate was forged in a year when Brian Mulroney was prime minister, the GST was introduced and the average Canadian surfed about 20 channels.
There were no DVDs, PVRs, on-demand video, satellite radio, content streams, smartphones, tablets, Apple TV, YouTube, Pandora, Netflix, Amazon or even the Internet as we know it.
As technology reshaped media, CBC TV has tried to be all things to all Canadians.
And it has failed.
Read the full story here.

Friday, May 05, 2017

CBC reports Venezuela's opposition trying to stage a coup

Pro- and anti-government rallies totalling hundreds of thousands of people jammed Caracas, the capital of Venezuela, on Monday.
Supporters of President Nicolas Maduro accused opponents of trying to foment a coup d'état, but opposition leaders promised to continue protests that have shut down major cities over the past month.
See the news report here.

BUT ... is there another story?  Do you have a twitter account?  CBC news recently ran this story on their twitter account (@CBCNews) and this is a sampling of responses to that story:

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