Its 2017: what case can be made for the Government to be in the broadcasting business, competing unfairly with the private sector? The CBC receives advertising and cable/satellite fees-fees greater than CTV and Global but this is not enough for the greedy CBC who also receive more than a billion dollars of your tax money. And now the new Trudeau Government has promised at least an additional $150 million dollars a year to this biased, wasteful government broadcaster. As is, Taxpayers continue to be hosed to the tune of about $100,000,000 (yes, 100 MILLION) of our taxes every 30 days with no CBC accountability to taxpayers as they continue with their biased news service serving only the extreme socialists and anti-Semitics. Wake up Canada!

cbcExposed continues to hear from confidential sources inside the CBC about the "scandal du jour" and we will continue to expose their reports of waste, abuse and bias while we protect our sources. We take joy in knowing CBC-HQ visits us daily to research our stories such as the CBC Sunshine List, ongoing scandals including the epic Dr. Leenen case against The Fifth Estate (the largest libel case ever awarded against the media in Canadian history) where no one at CBC was fired and taxpayers paid the award and legal costs for this CBC Libel action. Writers and filmmakers take note-this is a Perfect story for a Documentary!

cbcExposed continues to enjoy substantial visitors coming from Universities and Colleges across Canada who use us for research in debates, exams, etc. We ask students to please join us in this mission; you have the power to make a difference! And so can private broadcasters who we know are hurting from the dwindling Advertising revenue pool and the CBC taking money from that pool while also unfairly getting Tax subsidies money. It's time to stop being silent and start speaking up.

Our cbcExposed Twitter followers and frequent visitors to cbcExposed continue to motivate us to expose CBC’s abuse and waste of tax money as well as exposing their ongoing left wing bully-like news bias. Polls meanwhile show that Canadians favour selling the wasteful government owned media giant and to put our tax money to better use for all Canadians. The Liberals privatized Petro Canada and Air Canada; it’s time for the Trudeau Liberals to privatize the CBC, not give them more tax money.

What does it take for real change at the CBC? You! Our blog now contains a link to the Politicians contact info for you to make your voice heard. Act now and contact your MP, the Cabinet and Prime Minister ... tell them to stop wasting your money, and ... sell the CBC.

Monday, September 30, 2013

suing the Fifth Estate for plagiarism

Bob McKeown has an obvious thesis. He claims, quite correctly, that Fox News has aided in the division of the United States into Red and Blue. He calls it “a very un-civil war”. Ironically he uses Al Franken and his Air America to confirm his thesis that Fox News is conservative (and thus quite evil). Yet, he ignores that by appealing to Franken he becomes unfaithful to his original thesis of media division of opinion as unfavorable.

I’d venture to guess that Bob took a lot of notes when he saw the Democratic Party funded documentary on Fox News: Outfoxed. All of the points were there. If I produced Outfoxed, I’d look into suing the Fifth Estate for plagiarism.

There is something quite ironic about the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation identifying media bias when the American news channel itself will compete directly with CBC for viewers.

Consider that these powerful positions are appointed by the government and that state media should of course be unbiased.

The CBC documentary on Fox News dreads a division of opinion in the news media concerning the stories that are reported, the facts which are selected, and the tone of the broadcast.

Read the full story.

Friday, September 27, 2013

CBC will be the only game in town after they shut down your local newspaper

CBC is no longer just a radio and TV broadcaster. They are turning themselves into a major media machine ready to take on one and all in the new digital age. And they are using your tax dollars to do it.

The newest target — your local newspaper.

CBC and their supporters love to talk about how they are the public broadcaster, keeping the public airwaves open for Canadian stories.

That’s part of their justification for picking your pocket and mine to get their billion-dollar-per-year subsidy. But now that billion-dollar subsidy is being used to take on an industry that CBC was never meant to be part of — newspapers.

CBC.ca is more than a website, it is a newspaper, magazine and wire service all in one and it is completely free.

Consumers may like getting their news for free, but if things don’t change, then CBC will be the only game in town after they shut down your local newspaper.

Read the full story.

Are YOU ok with this?

Thursday, September 26, 2013

It took CBC six years to respond to an access to information request

It took CBC six years to respond to an access to information request on how the state broadcaster handles overtime payments.

A request was submitted in October 2007 asking for details on the top 20 overtime earners in both French and English CBC. A reply was received on September 5, 2013.

Access to information requests are supposed to be answered within 30 days.

Read the full story.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

The secret deal called for CBC to provide a documentary segment

Only in the wacky world of the government would it make sense for one government agency to pay a Crown corporation money to do the job that they are already funded to do.

But that's what happens here in official Ottawa.

Last year, Parks Canada was headed to Arctic waters to look for the sunken ships of the ill-fated Franklin expedition. Sounds like a great story, the kind lots of Canadians and lots of Canadian broadcasters would be interested in.

But Parks Canada struck a secret deal with CBC to grant it the exclusive rights to the search and then paid CBC to take those broadcast rights.

Broadcasters normally pay and pay big to get exclusive broadcast rights. From CBC paying millions of taxpayer dollars to get the rights to NHL hockey, to bidding wars for events such as the Olympics or Super Bowl, broadcasters pay for the right to air a program.

Unless Parks Canada is involved.

The secret deal called for CBC to provide a documentary segment for The National, segments for the nightly news on CBC English and French and web content in both languages.

In return, Parks Canada would pay CBC $65,000 cash, plus tax. They would also pay for travel, including $10,000 to transport one part of CBC's crew up north.

Why would they agree to do this?

Read the full story.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

CBC, with 22 lawyers, spent almost $900Gs on outside help to fight lawsuit

Despite having 22 lawyers on staff, CBC spent close to $900,000 on top-flight lawyers from an outside firm to fight a lawsuit that could have been settled with an apology.

CBC's legal costs to defend a lawsuit brought by filmmakers Claude Fournier and Marie-Jose Raymond topped $1 million. But new documents released by the state broadcaster show the legal firm Borden, Ladner, Gervais billed $871,769.03 for its services.

CBC eventually lost the lawsuit and paid the filmmakers $200,000 in damages, which drove the total cost well over $1 million.

The three-year legal ordeal could have been wrapped up if CBC executives had uttered a simple phrase: We're sorry.

Read the full story.

Monday, September 23, 2013

Parks Canada struck a secret deal with CBC

Only in the wacky world of the government would it make sense for one government agency to pay a Crown corporation money to do the job that they are already funded to do.

Last year, Parks Canada was headed to Arctic waters to look for the sunken ships of the ill-fated Franklin expedition. Sounds like a great story, the kind lots of Canadians and lots of Canadian broadcasters would be interested in.

But Parks Canada struck a secret deal with CBC to grant it the exclusive rights to the search and then paid CBC to take those broadcast rights.

The secret deal called for CBC to provide a documentary segment for The National, segments for the nightly news on CBC English and French and web content in both languages.

Now this looks like CBC is being paid for news coverage, and quite frankly it is.

Read the full story.

Friday, September 20, 2013

The CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, lost his temper ...

The CBC is throwing a tantrum — using your tax dollars.

They had a lawyer send a letter to us here at the Sun, complaining because we criticize their wasteful spending, their lack of accountability, and their bizarre broadcasting decisions, like their big foray into Internet porn.

The CBC’s president, Hubert Lacroix, lost his temper and wrote to the entire board of directors of Quebecor, the company that owns the Sun.

Read the full story.

Thursday, September 19, 2013

CBC president Hubert Lacroix admitted there was sexual harassment

CBC president Hubert Lacroix didn’t let facts get in the way of a good rant Tuesday at a House of Commons committee looking into sexual harassment at the state broadcaster.

Lacroix accused Lilley of attacking the broadcaster after he was given 1,454 documents under access to information that were mostly blacked out.

Lilley requested information on incidents of sexual harassment or inappropriate behaviour in Ottawa and Toronto dating back to January 2010.

At committee, Lacroix admitted there was one case of sexual harassment in one of the cities, but didn’t explain why the CBC redacted it.

Read the full story.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

CBC conflict of interest ...

One of the NDP's strongest advocates for the CBC is being paid tens of thousands of dollars a year by the state broadcaster while voting on the CBC's funding and debating its future.

Liberal and Conservative MPs now say NDP MP Andrew Cash should resign his position on the House of Commons heritage committee for violating conflict of interest rules.

Read the full story.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

CBC was the subject of 71 new complaints ...

CBC may not be adhering to the law and is still handing out blank pages on a frequent basis but that was good enough for the state broadcaster to get an A in a report card from federal information commissioner Suzanne Legault.

In her report two years ago, Legault gave CBC an F for their refusal to respond to requests in a timely manner. The Access to Information Act allows Canadians to pay $5 to find out details about government business. The law requires a response in 30 days, while CBC's average response time is 36 days.

CBC was the subject of 71 new complaints over the last year including 55 for refusal to disclose information. A recent request for information on a contract with Microsoft saw most information stripped out with CBC claiming it was against the economic interests of Canada to release it.

Read the full story.

Monday, September 16, 2013

CBC - Breaking news or breaking rules?

Breaking news or breaking rules?

One of the public broadcaster's news vans was spotted parked in a disabled spot in downtown Toronto Monday.

Jim Murphy said he was in the Bay-Grosvenor Streets area around 9 a.m. Monday when he noticed the CBC van parked in a parking spot reserved for the disabled. It was located in front of the YMCA, on 20 Grosvenor St., he added.

Murphy said the location is frequently used by people who drop off passengers with disabilities.

The van was parked in the spot from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., according to Murphy.

Read the full story.

Friday, September 13, 2013

It's in the public interest to have CBC undergo media scrutiny

It's in the public interest to have CBC undergo media scrutiny, Quebecor CEO Pierre Karl Peladeau told MPs at a House committee Thursday.

Peladeau said numerous requests put into the broadcaster by newsrooms in his media company were meant to hold it accountable for the $1.16 billion it gets from federal coffers.

"We believe our demands are not only legitimate and in the public interest, but that they are also in line with the law," he said.

Peladeau decried the delays over demands for search fees and complaints related to filed access requests that eventually resulted in little information actually being released by the CBC and its French-language equivalent, Radio-Canada.

Read the full story.

As a taxpayer who funds CBC, what do you think?

Thursday, September 12, 2013

"Sunshine List" for CBC employees ...

Conservative MP Brent Rathgeber's bill would create a "sunshine list" to make public which civil servants and CBC employees make more than $188,000 annually, and would allow the information commissioner to investigate complaints that the CBC is too secretive in its responses to Access to Information requests.

Good or Bad idea?  This is YOUR tax money.

Read the full story.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

CBC president Hubert Lacroix didn’t let facts get in the way

CBC president Hubert Lacroix didn’t let facts get in the way of a good rant Tuesday at a House of Commons committee looking into sexual harassment at the state broadcaster.

Lacroix attacked two Sun News Network personalities — Byline host Brian Lilley and The Source host Ezra Levant — for “deliberately misleading” Canadians for reporting on sexual harassment at the publicly-funded CBC and host David Suzuki’s demands when he’s on speaking tours.

Read the full story.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

CBC demonstrates how "deeply out-of-touch the network has become."

The CBC has commissioned a study to determine whether its news is biased, the president of the public broadcaster told the Senate finance committee this week.

The announcement came as Conservative senators grilled him Wednesday demanding to see contracts proving CBC wasn't sharing polling data with the Liberal Party of Canada.

Sen. Doug Finley, Prime Minister Stephen Harper's former campaign manager, said it was "totally unacceptable" for CBC to use a pollster who had advised the Liberals to "bring on a culture war" based on information paid for by taxpayers.

Conservative Party spokesman Fred DeLorey said if CBC needs a study to determine the appropriateness of using a Liberal Party donor as a pollster, it demonstrates how "deeply out-of-touch the network has become."

Read the full story.

Monday, September 09, 2013

Time for the CBC to leave the nest

The verdict is in: after 75 years of government handouts to the CBC, Canadians want to take the training wheels off, and let the state broadcaster fend for itself without its $1.1-billion annual cheque from taxpayers. 

That's the word from a major new public opinion survey conducted by Abacus Data Inc. Funny enough, the hundreds of polls paid for by the CBC never asked those questions - or if they did, the results were never made public.

 Abacus asked 1,003 Canadians to give their views about the best way to finance the CBC. Fifty-three per cent of Canadians said it should continue as a non-profit organization - it should sell ads if it can, and make the rest up through contributions from viewers. That's similar to the PBS model in the United States, a public broadcaster that has regular telethons where people who like their brand of programming (and politics) can prove it by cutting a cheque.

Read the full story.

Friday, September 06, 2013

CBC tells Parliament 'no' ...

CBC has told parliamentarians, the people who vote for their $1.1-billion annual subsidy, that they cannot know how the state broadcaster spends its money.

At an appearance before the Senate finance committee last May, CBC president Hubert Lacroix was asked how much is spent on Newsworld, CBC's all-news channel.

Lacroix told Senator Fred Dickson those figures were confidential.

Read the full story.

Thursday, September 05, 2013

CBC has built an empire unto itself ... with our tax dollars!

Canadians vastly underestimate the amount of money the federal government gives to the CBC each year and most say it's too much money, according to a new poll done exclusively for QMI Agency.

More than 80% of a group surveyed by research firm Abacus Data did not know the CBC will get $1.1 billion from the federal government this year. Only one-quarter believe the CBC get only about one-tenth of what the broadcaster actually receives.

Most Canadians - 60% - also thought the CBC gets too much money, including a majority of participants who vote Conservative or NDP. Abacus Data conducted a poll online with 1,003 Canadians from Aug. 12 to 15.

"It seems like the CBC has built an empire unto itself within the expenditures of the federal government. Who are they accountable to? They're ultimately accountable to us, but they're not showing it," said Stephen Taylor, who works for National Citizens Coalition.

Read the full story.

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

CBC employee Greg Weston is shocked!

CBC employee Greg Weston is shocked that other departments act just like CBC.

If Greg Weston thinks the Privy Council Office is bad at releasing documents through access to information then he should try filing requests for documents on his employer.

Weston, who spent years writing about government waste for Sun Media before getting his nose in at the trough at CBC, is expressing shock and outrage that “not an email, memo or even a sticky note” has been released by PCO in the Senate expense scandal.

Read the full story.

Tuesday, September 03, 2013

“This is false. They (CBC) should retract this piece of shoddy journalism”

The opposition used what the Tories called a “false” news report Friday to accuse the Prime Minister’s Office of controlling a $1-million secret party slush fund and using it to pay off Sen. Mike Duffy’s ill-gotten housing expenses.

The Conservative Party, Tory MPs and the PMO categorically denied the existence of the stash the state-owned broadcaster said was administered by Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s former chief of staff, Nigel Wright.

“This is false. They (CBC) should retract this piece of shoddy journalism,” party spokesman Fred DeLorey said in a statement.

“All Conservative Party expenses are paid by one account, controlled by the Conservative Party. All funds are properly reported to Elections Canada and audited annually,” he said.

Read the full story.

Monday, September 02, 2013

CBC shelled out $60Gs on 9 meetings -- many near its own headquarters

CBC's top executives spent more than $60,000 over six months holding meetings in luxury hotels and resorts and expensing such items as sparkling wine and limousine rides.

Documents released under Access to Information show the CBC spent at least $61,500 on nine meetings between January and June 2006.

The meetings were held according to CBC/Radio-Canada guidelines, CBC spokesman Marco Dube wrote in an e-mail. When face-to-face meetings are required, "off-site meetings are usually better to avoid disruptions."

Stays in expensive resorts topped the bill. More than $21,600 was spent sending 21 CBC and Radio-Canada human resources managers and senior executives to the ritzy Chateau Beauvallon in Mont-Tremblant, Que., for two days. The limo costs alone for one vice-president amounted to $1,009.94.

Read the full story.